American Arborvitae

American Arborvitae

Arbor Walk #62, Treekeeper ID #4666

The American Arborvitae is most prevalent in eastern and central Canada, and found in Northern Illinois, Ohio, and New York as well as scattered populations further south. St. Louis is near the southern end of the tree's range, and it benefits from being in a slightly shadier location than they would prefer in their northern ranges.

American Basswood

American Basswood

Arbor Walk #153, Treekeeper ID #8101

This tree is a grafted clone of the original Basswood which has been growing in Brookings Quad for more than 100 years.

American Basswood (removed July 2023)

American Basswood (removed July 2023)

Arbor Walk #17, Treekeeper ID #1937

This is one of the oldest and largest trees on campus. It has large green leaves and small, sweetly scented flowers. Recently, efforts have been taken to preserve and continue on the genetic lineage of this tree whose history follows that of WashU's Danforth Campus.

American Beech

American Beech

Arbor Walk #48, Treekeeper ID #1979

This tree has dark green leaves which turn bronze in the fall. Its flowers are yellowish-green, and the female flowers yield edible beechnuts which ripen in the fall.

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American Chestnut

Arbor Walk #111, Treekeeper ID #6353

The American Chestnut is a historically and cuturally important tree that unfortunately has a sad story. This species used to be one of the biggest and most numerous trees in the Eastern United States, but it is now considered functionally extinct.

American Elm

American Elm

Arbor Walk #31, Treekeeper ID #2408

The American Elm is native to much of Eastern North America and grows in low, moist areas and along streams across the state of Missouri.

American Holly

American Holly

Arbor Walk #69, Treekeeper ID #3034

The American Holly is a broad-leaved evergreen tree reaching 40 to 50 feet high, densely pyramidal in youth becoming more open and symmetrically conical with age.

American Hop Hornbeam

American Hop Hornbeam

Arbor Walk #112

Native to much of the continental U.S., the American Hop Hornbeam is a great tree. It has orangish-brown, loose bark and catkins that stay on over winter making it an interesting and beautiful tree year-round.

American Hornbeam

American Hornbeam

Arbor Walk #20, Treekeeper ID #1933

Native to the midwest, the American Hornbeam typically grows as an understory tree, in wetter areas. Its leaf is dark green, ovate, with doubly serrated edges.

American Smoketree

American Smoketree

Arbor Walk #166, Treekeeper ID #6601

The American Smoketree is a Missouri native tree with fabulous color in the spring and summer, thanks to its smoke-like purple-haired inflorescences.

American Sycamore

American Sycamore

Arbor Walk #60, Treekeeper ID #5449

The Sycamore is regarded as one of the largest trees native to eastern North America, and was historically prized by Native Americans for the construction of dugout canoes. Ecologically, they are early colonizers to newly available habitat, and support animal shelters as they mature.

American Witchhazel

American Witchhazel

Arbor Walk #119

The American Witchhazel is one of the few deciduous woody plants that flowers after the leaves fall. It typically flowers during October to December.

Amur Cork Tree

Amur Cork Tree

Arbor Walk #101, Treekeeper ID #1905

The Amur Cork Tree is native to China and Japan. The species is able to tolerate some drought conditions and urban pollutants. They are known for attractive, furrowed bark that resembles cork, as is apparent within its name.

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Arizona Sycamore

Arbor Walk #171, Treekeeper ID #7177

The Arizona Sycamore is one of three native sycamore species in North America, and is the species with the most limited range.

Ashe’s Magnolia

Ashe’s Magnolia

Arbor Walk #92, Treekeeper ID #4775

The Ashe’s Magnolia is a regional native to the Southeastern US and adaptable to the St. Louis Region, typically growing to 10’ to 20’ tall and 10’ to 15’ wide.

Austrian Pine

Austrian Pine

Arbor Walk #83, Treekeeper ID #3668

This is a medium to large conifer than is native to Europe and Asia. They are dense and pyramidal when young and round with age. These trees feature spreading branches, stiff, dark green needles in bundles, and oval cones.

Bald Cypress

Bald Cypress

Arbor Walk #16, Treekeeper ID #1427

This tree is native to wetlands and swamps in the Midwest but is adaptable to urban conditions. Its needlelike foliage turns russet red and drops in the fall.

Bald Cypress

Bald Cypress

Arbor Walk #37, Treekeeper ID #2507

The Bald Cypress is the state tree of Louisiana. Despite its resemblance to a needled evergreen tree in the summer, it is actually deciduous. The 'Mickelson' is a cultivar of the Bald Cypress, and has a narrower shape and denser foliage than the native species.

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Beach Plum

Arbor Walk #143, Treekeeper ID #6824

This fruit tree derives its name from its restricted habitat in sandy areas like beaches, dunes, and tidal streams.

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Bebb’s Hybrid Oak

Arbor Walk #145, Treekeeper ID #6550

This oak is a spontaneously occurring hybrid of the White Oak (Quercus alba) and the Bur Oak (Q. macrocarpa).

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Bigtooth Aspen

Arbor Walk #155, Treekeeper ID #8051

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Black Gum

Black Gum

Arbor Walk #32, Treekeeper ID #2247

The Black Gum, also called Tupelo, is a Missouri native and flexible mid-western species capable of growing in both standing water and rocky slopes.

Black Gum

Black Gum

Arbor Walk #91, Treekeeper ID #5922

The Black Gum, also known regionally as Black Tupelo, is a part of the Nyssaceae family, which used to be under the dogwood family.

Black Walnut

Black Walnut

Arbor Walk #18, Treekeeper ID #1386

This is a large native tree whose wood is used for woodworking in the furniture and cabinet industry.

Black Walnut (Deaccessioned)

Black Walnut (Deaccessioned)

Arbor walk #61, Treekeeper ID #5016

This is a large deciduous tree common to woodlands in the eastern United States from Massachusetts to Texas. It is natively found in rich woods and fertile river valleys across the state of Missouri.

Bottlebrush Buckeye

Bottlebrush Buckeye

Arbor Walk #89

Bottlebrush Buckeye is not native to Missouri but is very adaptable to the St. Louis Region. It is a multiple stem understory small tree or large shrub which colonizes by suckering.

Boxelder Maple

Boxelder Maple

Arbor Walk #118

Boxelder Maple is notable because of the usual leaves this species has compared to all other native maples. Instead of the normal simple leaf, it instead has compound leaves, which means it has leaflets.

Bur Oak

Bur Oak

Arbor walk #108, Treekeeper ID #1757

This tree is in the Fragaceae family and is native to Missouri. It is a deciduous tree with broad and rounded crown, which is good for shading. The leaves are leathery, dark green and turn to yellow-brown in fall. The oval acorns is large in size with fringed burry cups.

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Butternut

Arbor Walk #161

Although this tree has a broad range within the Upper Midwest and Northeast United States, it is uncommon in most of its range, being overshadowed by its ubiquitous relative Juglans nigra, the black walnut. Its lack of prominence is mainly caused by the deadly butternut canker, which only affects J. cinerea.

Carolina Buckthorn

Carolina Buckthorn

Arbor Walk #130

Even though it is called a buckthorn, Carolina Buckthorn has no spines. The shrub is well known for its bright red drupes during the summer. The fruit eventually mature to black and attracts many wildlife species, especially birds.

Carolina Silverbell

Carolina Silverbell

Arbor Walk #132

The best place to find this plant in the wild is the Great Smokey Mountains where they thrive. Squirrels love the four-winged, dry fruit, and Tennessee beekeepers describe it as a great honey tree. The wood is also sometimes used for cabinets, veneer, and carvings.

Cedar Elm

Cedar Elm

Arbor Walk #163

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Cherrybark Oak

Cherrybark Oak

Arbor walk #71, TreeKeeper ID #3472

Cherrybark Oak is a medium to large-sized deciduous tree native to the Southern US including the southeast corner of Missouri. The Cherrybark Oak looks very similar to another Missouri native, Southern Red Oak. So much so, that this tree was mislabeled as a Southern Red Oak for many years in the Arboretum.

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Chestnut Oak

Arbor Walk #152, Treekeeper ID #6051

The Chestnut Oak has a native range just bordering but not within Missouri; it thrives in dry uplands from southern Maine to the Mississippi but primarily in the Appalachian Mountains.

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Chinese Fringetree

Arbor Walk #160

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Chinese Redbud

Arbor Walk #148

The Chinese Redbud is within the same genus as the Eastern Redbud, but features larger, bright magenta flowers and glossy heart-shaped leaves.

Chinkapin Oak

Chinkapin Oak

Arbor Walk #26, Treekeeper ID #1345

Native to the Midwest, the Chinkapin Oak can be easily recognized due to its small, toothed leaves. Unlike most oaks, the Chinkapin has unusually flaky and fissured bark.

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Chitalpa

Arbor Walk #164

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Chokecherry

Chokecherry

Arbor Walk #123

The wild Chokecherry is usually found in dense thickets due to its vast root system which can sprout runners, but on campus you will find them managed to prevent this. It blooms beautiful white flowers that eventually turn into dark purple fruit.

Common Hackberry

Common Hackberry

Arbor walk #8, Treekeeper ID #1696

This native tree performs well in urban conditions and is easily identified by its distinctive corky bark. But be careful because there are other relatives that are native to Missouri that have very similar bark.

Common Horse Chestnut

Common Horse Chestnut

Arbor walk #64, Treekeeper ID #5490

Despite being widely planted as an easy-to-grow shade tree for streets and landscapes throughout the Midwest, the Common Horse Chestnut is originally native to the Balkan region of Europe. The tree features showy white flowers in spring which in summer transition into fruit, consisting of one or two seeds encased in a spiny husk.

Common Thornless Honeylocust

Common Thornless Honeylocust

Arbor walk #28, Treekeeper ID #1610

This is a native plant, but if found in nature, its bark would likely be covered in long, sharp thorns. Arborists tend to plant this natural, thornless variant of the tree to allow people to see its beauty without obtaining injuries.

Common Thornless Honeylocust

Common Thornless Honeylocust

Arbor walk #78, Treekeeper ID #3229

The Honeylocust is a tough, medium-sized shade tree that usually grows around 60′ to 80′ tall. It has greenish-yellow to greenish-white flowers that appear in May or June.

Compton Hybrid Oak

Compton Hybrid Oak

Arbor Walk #128

The Compton Hybrid Oak is a natural hybrid between the Southern Live Oak and the Overcup Oak and can be found in the areas with overlapping distributions of the two parent species.

Cornelian Cherry Dogwood

Cornelian Cherry Dogwood

Arbor Walk #122

A beautiful non-native from Europe and Asia, this tree shows off its gorgeous star-shaped, yellow flowers in early spring before its leaves emerge.

Cucumber Tree Magnolia

Cucumber Tree Magnolia

Arbor walk #107, Treekeeper ID #5717

This tree is in the Magnoliaceae family and is native to Missouri. The cucumber tree is named by its cucumber-like fruit. The fruit is 2" to 3" long, slightly curved, and cylindrical, and to add to the cucumber appearance, the immature fruit is also green.

Dawn Redwood

Dawn Redwood

Arbor walk #73, Treekeeper ID #2196

The Dawn Redwood is considered a living fossil because it was only known due to the fossil remains from individuals that lived with the dinosaurs. It was not until the 1940's that a small population was discovered in a remote valley of the Szechwan province of China.

Deodar Cedar

Deodar Cedar

Arbor walk #34, Treekeeper ID #3817

This tree species is originally native to the Himalayas range, but due to its high tolerance to heat for a true cedar, it is able to grow in certain specific conditions in the United States such as the St. Louis area.

Devil’s Walking Stick

Devil’s Walking Stick

Arbor Walk #121

This tree has many interesting features including late summer flowers, juicy black drupes, gigantic compound leaves, and sharp prickles covering many parts of the plant.

Downy Hawthorn

Downy Hawthorn

Arbor walk #67, Treekeeper ID #1716

The Downy Hawthorn is a deciduous tree in the rose family, and is native to the Midwest. Despite the unpleasant scent and the presence of long thorns, the tree is much loved for the beauty of its flowers in the spring and fruits in the summer.